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Section Five - Appendices

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5.1 Map of Tasmania

5.2 Roles of Government

5.3 Associated Documents

5.4 Emergency Management Committees

5.5 Emergency Management Plans

5.6 Approaches to Developing Mitigation Strategies

5.7 Emergency Management Contacts

5.8 Financial Administration Guide

5.9 Common Incident Control System (CICS)

5.10 Response Centre Arrangements

5.11 Summary of Australian Defence Force Arrangements: DFACA and DACC

5.12 National Principles for Disaster Recovery

5.13 Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)

5.1 Map of Tasmania

Map of Tasmania

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5.2 Roles of Government

Broad emergency management responsibilities for the three spheres of government are outlined below:


Municipal

State

Australian Government

Prevention
and Mitigation

Identify, research, assess and treat risks (within the municipal area and/or in partnership with neighbouring Councils)

Apply a range of strategies to prevent and mitigate the affects of emergency events (e.g. land-use planning schemes and approval processes, application of building codes, capital works-flood levees)

Represent community interests for emergency management at other levels of government and contribute to decision- making processes

Maintain relevant legislation and policy for comprehensive emergency management (PPRR) in Tasmania

Provide support for research and emergency risk management

Represent community interests for emergency management at other levels of government and contribute to decision- making processes

Implement mitigation strategies (e.g. land-use planning directives, fuel reduction programs)

Undertake research and risk assessment of national significance

Provide warnings for severe weather events

Provide financial support for national mitigation priorities and strategies

Develop national policy

Preparedness

Establish and maintain a municipal emergency management committee, or participate in a combined committee

Maintain systems and processes for municipal emergency management, and maintain a written record of these arrangements in the municipal emergency management plan

Recommend and support a Municipal Emergency Management Coordinator and Deputy

Have arrangements in place so that municipal volunteer SES units are maintained to support the plan, including the provision of adequate resources and facilities for the volunteers

Develop and implement municipal community awareness and education programs and warning systems

Maintain the State emergency management framework including plans, arrangements and key capabilities

Strengthen partnerships with and between emergency management stakeholders

Develop and implement Statewide community awareness and education programs and warning systems

Appoint State and Regional Controllers and Municipal and Deputy Coordinators

Appoint Regional Recovery Coordinators (by function)

Maintain national and Australian Government plans for international situations and inter- jurisdictional coordination

Maintain key resources (e.g. the Attorney-General’s Department Coordination Centre, national medical stockpile)

Capacity development (e.g. training courses, forums, research initiatives, equipment schemes)

Response

Support the response Management Authority in accordance with the municipal plan (including the provision of available Council resources)

Coordinate Support Agencies at the municipal level to address consequences arising from an emergency

Respond to emergencies that can be managed at the municipal level

Provide resources and facilities for the purpose of managing/coordinating emergency response activities of State and regional significance

Coordinate response operations

Source additional assistance from Commonwealth agencies as required

Coordinate response and recovery arrangements for overseas events

Coordinate inter- jurisdictional support

Arrange for Australian Defence Force assistance to be provided to the jurisdictions

Coordinate national consultation in emergencies of national significance

Recovery

Coordinate recovery efforts for the municipal area, including input into other regional recovery initiatives

Deliver recovery services from municipal and State resources

Support analysis of relevant emergency events

Provide financial and other assistance through the supply and coordination of human and material resources

Lead or enable assessment and analysis of the impact of emergency events of State significance

Provide experienced people to support the Regional Controller across the four elements of Recovery

Provide financial support to jurisdictions

Provide individual income support

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5.3 Associated Documents

Legislation

5.3.1 A range of legislation supports emergency management in Tasmania and specific references are usually included in emergency plans. The list below shows the legislation identified by State Government stakeholders as having particular relevance for State-level emergency management. This list includes, but is not limited to:

Legislation

Related hazard/function

Administration

Acts Interpretation Act 1931

This Act sets out common terminology and requirements across Tasmanian legislation including defining the three regions in which the Tasmanian emergency management system operates.

DoJ

Administrative Arrangements Orders
(No. 3) 2014

These Orders allocate responsibility to Government departments for the administration of Tasmanian legislation.

DoJ

Ambulance Service Act 1982

All hazards

DHHS

Animal Health Act 1995

Biosecurity emergencies

DPIPWE

Coroners Act 1995

All hazards

DoJ

Dangerous Goods (Road and Rail Transport) Act 2010

Hazardous chemicals

DoJ

Electricity Supply Industry Act 1995

Energy supply emergency

STATE GROWTH

Electronic Transactions Act 2000

This Act provides the framework for using electronic signatures (e.g. approval processes for out-of-session decisions).

DoJ

Emergency Management Act 2006

This act sets the framework for Tasmanian emergency management.

DPEM

Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994

Environmental emergencies

DPIPWE

Explosives Act 2012

Dangerous Substances

DoJ

Financial Management and Audit Act 1990

Responsibilities for State Government Heads of Agency

DTF

Fire Service Act 1979

Fire

DPEM

Gas Act 2000

Energy supply emergency

STATE GROWTH

General Fire Regulations 2010

Fire

DPEM

Intergovernmental Agreement on Australia’s National Arrangements for the Management of Security Risks Associated with Chemicals (IGA)

Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals

DPAC

Land-use Planning and Approvals Act 1993 Management Act 1995

All hazards

DoJ

Local Government Act 1993

Council responsibilities/All hazards

DPAC

Marine Search and Rescue Act 1971

Search and rescue (function)

DPEM

Petroleum Products Emergency Act 1994

Energy supply emergency

STATE GROWTH

Plant Quarantine Act 1997

Biosecurity emergencies

DPIPWE

Police Powers (Public Safety) 2005

All hazards

DoJ

Pollution of Waters by Oil and Noxious Substances Act 1987

Environmental emergencies

DPIPWE

Public Account Act 1986

Relief and recovery arrangements

DTF

Public Health Act 1997

Public health emergencies

DHHS

Quarantine Act 1908 (Commonwealth)

Biosecurity and public health emergencies

DPIPWE
DHHS

Rail Infrastructure Act 2007

Transport crash-railway

STATE GROWTH

Rail Safety National Law Act 201

Transport crash-railway

STATE GROWTH

Roads and Jetties Act 1935

Infrastructure failure (State roads and bridges)

STATE GROWTH

Security-sensitive Dangerous Substances Act 2005

Intentional violence

DoJ

Terrorism (Commonwealth Powers) Act 2002

Intentional violence

DoJ

Terrorism (Preventative Detention) Act 2005

Intentional violence

DoJ

Terrorism Insurance Act 2003

Intentional violence

Australian Government

Traffic Act 1925

Infrastructure failure (State roads and bridges), Transport crash-road vehicles

STATE GROWTH

Victims of Crime Compensation Act 1994

Intentional violence

DoJ

Water Management Act 1999

Flood from dam failure

DPIPWE

Work Health and Safety Act 2012

Occupational health and safety

DoJ

Plans

National and Commonwealth Plans

5.3.2 The main plans that have relevance to all hazard emergency management arrangements within Tasmania are:

a. COMDISPLAN Australian Government Disaster Response Plan

b. National Counter Terrorism Plan, and NCTP

c. COMRECEPLAN Australian Government Plan for the Reception of Australian Citizens and Approved Foreign Nationals Evacuated from Overseas.

5.3.3 Other national plans that have relevance to Tasmanian arrangements are acknowledged within the State emergency plans (See Appendix 5.5).

Tasmanian Plans

5.3.4 State emergency plans current at the time of approval of this plan are listed in Appendix 5.5. This list is maintained by the SES on its website. These plans contextualise the all hazard arrangements outlined in this plan, and create linkages with other specific national and regional arrangements. Some State Government agencies also maintain agency specific plans for emergency management.

5.3.5 Regional plans for North-West, Northern and Southern regions contextualise the relevant all hazard arrangements outlined in this plan, for each region.

5.3.6 Municipal plans contextualise the relevant all hazard arrangements outlined in regional plans, for each municipal area.

Standards

5.3.7 The current versions of the standards listed next have particular relevance for Tasmanian emergency management:

a. AS 3745-2010 Planning For Emergencies in Facilities

b. AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 Risk Management–Principles and Guidelines

c. AS/NZS 4581 Management System Integration

d. HB 167 Security Risk Management, and

e. HB 221 Business Continuity Management.

Other Resources

5.3.8 ‘Australasian Inter-Service Incident Management System (AIIMS)’ maintained by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council (AFAC)

5.3.9 ‘Climate Change Impacts and Risk Assessment—A guide for business and Government’, (Department of Environment and Heritage, Australian Greenhouse Office), 2006

5.3.10 Emergency Management Australia maintains a set of manuals and guides that are publicly available at www.em.gov.au Link to External Site

5.3.11 Emergency Management Framework for Vulnerable People

5.3.12 ‘Emergency Warnings: Choosing your words’ (Attorney-General’s Department), 2008

5.3.13 Final Report of the Review of the 2010-11 Flood Warnings and Response, December 2011

5.3.14 ‘General Insurance Catastrophe Coordination Arrangements’, Insurance Council of Australia, March 2012 www.insurancecouncil.com.au

5.3.15 Land-use Planning: The Guide to considering natural hazard risks in land-use planning and building contro

5.3.16 ‘National Inquiry on Bushfire Mitigation and Management’ (report to COAG), January 2005

5.3.17 National Strategy for Disaster Resilience (NSDR)

5.3.18 ‘Natural Disasters in Australia Reforming Mitigation, Relief and Recovery Arrangements’ for the Council of Australian Governments (COAG),
August 2002

5.3.19 Perth Hills Bushfire 2011 Report, June 2011

5.3.20 Queensland Floods Commission of Inquiry, Interim Report, August 2011

5.3.21 SEMC Strategic Directions Framework

5.3.22 State Bushfire Safety Policy

5.3.23 ‘Style Manual’ 6th Edition 2002 (Snooks and Co)

5.3.24 ‘Tasmania Fire Service and Tasmania Police Position on the Protection of People and Homes Threatened by Bushfires’, September 2007

5.3.25 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission, Final Report, July 2010

5.3.26 2012 Tasmania State Natural Disaster Risk Assessment (TSNDRA)

5.3.27 2013 Tasmanian Bushfires Inquiry Report, October 2013

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5.4 Emergency Management Committees

5.4.1 Typical Membership and Reporting Arrangements

This appendix summarises the typical membership and reporting arrangements for committees related to the Emergency Management Act 2006. Arrangements for sub-committees and Affected Area Recovery Committees are also included. While meeting frequency is not specified in The Act, a minimum of two meetings per year is recommended (meeting more frequently as required).

5.4.1.1 Ministerial Committee

Chairperson

Premier, Tasmania

Executive Officer

To be determined by the Premier

Title

Ministerial Committee

Membership (Determined by the Premier Section 12)

Minister for Police and Emergency Management

State Controller

Any other Ministers or persons the Premier considers appropriate

Reports to

Premier, Tasmania

5.4.1.2 State Emergency Management Committee (SEMC)

Chairperson

State Controller (Commissioner DPEM)

Executive Officer

Director, SES

Title

State Emergency Management Committee

Membership (Determined by State Controller Section 8)

Secretary, DPAC

Secretary, DHHS

Co-Chairs of SEMAG

Chief Officer, TFS

CEO, AT

Any other persons the State Controller considers appropriate.

Reports to

Minister for Police and Emergency Management, or Premier, if Ministerial Committee has been activated.

5.4.1.3 Security and Emergency Management Advisory Group (SEMAG)

Co-Chairs

Deputy Commissioner of Police, Department of Police and Emergency Management

Deputy Secretary, Department of Premier and Cabinet

Executive Officer

Commander, SRCTU

Title

Security and Emergency Management Advisory Group

Membership (Determined by SEMC)

Deputy Secretaries:

-Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources

-Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

-Department of Justice

-Department of Education

-Department of Treasury and Finance

-Department of Economic Development, Tourism and the Arts

Department of Health and Human Services:

-Director of Public Health

-Chief Executive Officer, Tasmanian Ambulance Service

Department of Police and Emergency Management Link to External Site

-Director, SES

-Director, Forensic Science Service Tasmania

-Chief Officer, TFS

Department of Premier and Cabinet

-Head of Media, Government Communications Office

-Manager, Office of Security and Emergency Management

Reports to

SEMC

5.4.1.4 Regional Emergency Management Committees (REMC)

Chairperson

Regional Controllers

Executive Officer

Regional Managers State Emergency Service

Title

Northern/North-West/Southern Regional Emergency Management Committee

Membership
(Determined by the Regional Controller Section 15)

Regional representatives for State agencies based in the region, which can include: Fire, Ambulance, Police, Health, Education, others

Municipal Coordinators and Municipal Recovery Coordinators within the region

Other stakeholders in the region (e.g. ports-sea/air, dams, major facilities, Non-Government Organisations)

Reports to

SEMC through the SEMAG (through the Director State Emergency Service) unless otherwise directed

5.4.1.5 Municipal Emergency Management Committees (MEMC)

Chairperson

Municipal Chairperson (usually Council’s General Manager, Mayor or a senior Councillor)

Executive Officer

Municipal Coordinator

Title

Council or Area Emergency Management Committee

Membership
(Determined by the Municipal Chairperson Section 21)

Representatives from State agencies based in the municipal area, which can include: Fire, Ambulance, Police, Health (including the Regional Social Recovery Coordinators), Education, others

Council workers including: Environmental Health Officer, Municipal Coordinator, Municipal Recovery Coordinator and Deputies

Other stakeholders in the municipal area (e.g. ports-sea/air, dams, major facilities, Non-Government Organisations)

Reports to

Regional Committee (may also report to Council)

5.4.1.6 Sub-committees (Municipal, Regional and State) and other Stakeholder groups

Chairperson

Stakeholder Groups: Determined by existing
legislation/regulation/other agreement

Sub-committees:

-Municipal/Regional: As determined by the relevant committee

-State: As determined by the SEMAG/SEMC

Executive Officer

As for Chairperson (Arranged by chairing agency)

Title

As for Chairperson

Membership

As for Chairperson, with consideration given to:

-Content experts

-Related policy/protocol and operational advisers, owners and managers

-Other persons relevant to the scope of the group (e.g. airport, ports, dams, major facilities, Non-Government Organisations) etc.

Reports to

Municipal and Regional Sub-committees and Stakeholder Groups report to the relevant committee

State Sub-committees and Stakeholders Groups report to the SEMAG

5.4.1.7 Affected Area Recovery Committee (AARC)

Chairperson

The Chairperson for the municipal or regional AARC is authorised by the Regional Controller. It is usually the Mayor of the affected municipal area.

The Chairperson for the State AARC is authorised by the State Controller.

Executive Officer

As for Chair

Title

<Area or event> Affected Area Recovery Committee

Membership may include
but is not limited to

Mayors and a community representative from each affected municipal area

Regional Social Recovery Coordinator/s

State Emergency Service managers from Regional or State Headquarters (as required)

Nominated representatives from State Government agencies:

-Department of Treasury and Finance

-Department of Premier and Cabinet

-Department of Economic Development, Tourism and the Arts

-Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources

Relevant Commonwealth Government agencies

Non-Government Organisations involved in recovery efforts

Other persons relevant to the scope of the recovery effort

Reports to

Municipal/regional AARCs report to the Regional Controller

State AARCs report to the State Controller

5.4.2 Model Terms of Reference

A model structure for the Terms of Reference for emergency management committees and sub-committees is provided below (a model Terms of Reference for Affected Area Recovery Committee is maintained in Microsoft Word format at www.ses.tas.gov.au).

Committee

Title of the committee

Date and status
of these Terms

DRAFT or ACCEPTED and Issue X Year (use whole numbers only)
Example: ACCEPTED Issue 1 2009.

Enquiries

Executive Officer’s substantive position and organisation.

Review notes

Summary statement for reviewing the Terms of Reference. Example: These Terms of Reference are due for review in June 2010.

Background

Short statement about the committee’s background. This could include when it was first formed, major/recent achievements and any notable events that affect its operation.

Purpose

Short statement about what the committee is for. Include titles/sections of relevant legislation.

Functions

Optional. Identify the main ways the committee will operate/the main things it will do to achieve its stated purpose. It is recommended to limit these to 3-5 points.

Membership

Members

List the departments/organisations that typically make up the committee and their role (e.g. Chairperson, Executive Officer, member, proxy). Note that membership guidance included in this plan incorporates the requirements
of The Act.

Proxies

Note the general conditions for proxies. This should include the conditions or criteria for nominated proxies to take on the role. Example: Proxies should be nominated and they assume the member’s role if the member is unable to attend the meeting or is unable to perform their usual role for the committee.

Stakeholders/

Optional. Note the general conditions associated with others who are likely to be involved

Observers/Guests

in the committee’s operation, and list the organisations/positions that have been identified.

Appendices

Include any other information that is important for operational continuity of the committee. This includes, but is not limited to:

Roles and responsibilities (members, proxies, stakeholders,
observers, guests etc.)

Work program

Practices and protocols of the committee including, but not limited to: maintaining core documents (e.g. Terms of Reference, risk context statement, work program), describing meeting arrangements (e.g. frequency, usual practice for agendas, meeting notes etc.), decision-making protocols, quorum, reporting arrangements etc.

Header and Footer

Page numbers. ‘Page X of Y’ format is recommended at the bottom right of each page. Other information to be considered for inclusion is: Draft/Issue number and year of acceptance.

5.4.3 Current State and Regional Committees and Sub-committees

The following list provides a summary of the committees that are operating at regional and State level for emergency management. The agency that chairs the committee is shown in brackets. This list is current at the time of issue of this plan. It is updated at scheduled times and the current version can be found on the State Emergency Service website.

1

Bio-Security Preparedness Program Steering Committee

DPIPWE

2

North-West Regional Social Recovery Committee

THS

3

Northern Regional Emergency Management Committee

Regional Controller (TASPOL)

4

Northern Regional Social Recovery Committee

THS

5

North-West Regional Emergency Management Committee

Regional Controller (TASPOL)

6

Nuclear Powered Warships Visits Committee

SES

7

Security and Emergency Management Advisory Group (SEMAG)

TASPOL and DPAC

8

SEMAG Sub-Committee on Risk on Risk

SES

9

SEMAG Sub-Committee on Capability and Capacity

TFS

10

SEMAG Sub-Committee on Recovery and Resilience

DPAC

11

SEMAG Sub-Committee on Collaborative Leadership

TASPOL

12

Southern Regional Emergency Management Committee

Regional Controller (TASPOL)

13

Southern Regional Social Recovery Committee

THS

14

State Emergency Management Committee (SEMC)

State Controller (TASPOL)

15

State Emergency Media Committee

DPAC

16

State Health and Human Services Emergency Committee

DHHS

17

State Marine Pollution Committee

DPIPWE

18

State Road Rescue Committee

TASPOL

19

Tasmanian Consultative Committee on Fire Weather Services

BoM

20

Tasmanian Coronial Services Committee

DoJ

21

Tasmanian Disaster Victim Identification Committee

TASPOL

22

Tasmanian Flood Warning Consultative Committee

BoM

23

Tasmanian Hazardous Materials and CBRN Advisory Group

TFS

24

Tasmanian Search and Rescue Committee

TASPOL

25

Tasmanian Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) Working Group

TFS

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5.5 Emergency Management Plans

5.5.1 Plan Hierarchy

plan heirarchy chart

5.5.2 Current State Special Emergency Plans

The following list provides a summary of the emergency plans that are maintained at State level. These plans describe the arrangements for identified hazards or risks, and should be referred to for more information in specific situations. This list is current at the time of issue of this plan. It is updated at scheduled times and the current version can be found on the State Emergency Service website.

Row

Plan Title

Review Authority

Related National Plans/Groups

1.

Human Influenza Pandemic Emergencies

DPAC


2.

Interoperability Skills Arrangements for the Sharing of Skilled Resources in Tasmania

DPAC

N/A

3.

Port Safety Plan (Nuclear Powered Warships Visits)

SES

OPSMAN 1

4.

Rapid Impact Assessment

SES


5.

Recovery

DPAC

N/A

6.

State Fire Protection Plan

TFS

N/A

7.

State Tsunami Response Plan

SES


8.

Tasmanian Biosecurity Emergencies

DPIPWE

AUSVETPLAN, AQUAVETPLAN,

EMPPLAN, AGAINDPLNA,

PLANTPLAN, EADRA, NEBRA

9.

Tasmanian Coronial Services Plan

DoJ

National DVI Guidelines

10.

Tasmanian Counter-Terrorism Plan

DPEM

NCTP

11.

Tasmanian Energy Supply Plan (Draft)

STATE GROWTH

NLFERP

12.

Tasmanian Hazardous Materials Emergency Plan

TFS

N/A

13.

Tasmanian Mass Casualty Management Plan

DHHS

AUSTRAUMAPLAN

14.

Tasmania Public Health Emergencies Management Plan

DHHS

NFIRP, SAFEMEAT PLAN

15.

Tasmanian Search and Rescue Plan

DPEM

National Search and Rescue Response Arrangements (AMSA)

16.

Tasmanian Structural Collapse Plan

TFS

N/A

17.

Tasmanian Transport Crash Emergencies Plan

DPEM

AUSAUPLAN

Additional Australian Government Plans



Additional Australian Government Plans

COMDISPLAN

AUSSPREDPLAN 2014

AUSAVPLAN 2014

OSMASSCASPLAN 2014

COMRECEPLAN

COMARRPLAN

AUSPIRACYPLAN

NATCATDISPLAN

Details at www.em.gov.au/emergencymanagement/preparingforemergencies/plansandarrangements

5.5.3 Current State Emergency Associated Plans

The following list provides a summary of the associated sub-plans and arrangements that support and enable the State emergency plans.

Row

Plan Title

Review Authority

1.

Chemical, Biological and Radiological Security Incident Response Plan

TFS

2.

Department of Health and Human Services and Tasmanian Health Organisations Social Recovery Plan

DHHS

3.

DPIPWE – Emergency Management

DPIPWE

4.

Petroleum Products Emergency Plan

State Growth

5.

Plan for the Delivery of Integrated Emergency Management within the Department of Health and Human Services and Tasmanian Health Organisations.

DHHS

6.

State Road and Bridge Emergency Management Plan

State Growth

7.

Tasmanian Electricity Supply Emergency Management Plan

State Growth

8.

Tasmanian Gas Supply Emergency Coordination Plan

State Growth

9.

Tasmanian Health Action Plan for Pandemic Influenza (THAPPI)

DHHS

10.

Tasmanian Marine Chemical Spill Contingency Plan – TasChemPlan

DPIPWE

11.

Tasmanian Marine Oil Spill Contingency Plan

DPIPWE

12.

Tasmanian Public Health Emergencies Management Plan – Drinking Water Supply Incident Associate Plan

DHHS

13.

Tasmanian Public Health Emergencies Management Plan – Food Safety Incident Associate Plan

DHHS

14.

Tasmanian Public Health Emergencies Management Plan – Heatwave Incident Associate Plan

DHHS

15.

Tasmanian Public Health Emergencies Management Plan – Major Outbreaks Associate Plan

DHHS

16.

Tasmanian Public Health Emergencies Management Plan – Radioactive Materials Incident Associate Plan

DHHS

17.

Tasmanian Public Health Emergencies Management Plan – Recreational Water Incident Associate Plan

DHHS

18.

The State Bushfire Safety Policy

TFS

19.

The Tasmanian Road Accident Rescue Arrangements

TFS

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5.6 Approaches to Developing Mitigation Strategies

Developing mitigation strategies includes assessing control levels, to be used as part of a risk analysis, before rating a risk. The tool used for rating is illustrated in the control table under 5.6.1 Autonomy Levels. The table defines the control characteristics and the three levels for behavioural, procedural and physical controls and can be used to address both community and state processes.

5.6.1 Autonomy Levels

Level of Control

Behavioural ControlsReliance on human action initiated by individuals or groups based on their experience

Procedural Controls—Reliance on human action in accordance with prescribed approaches within a management system

Physical Controls—Automatic execution of controls within a management system and without requiring human action

1.

Immature organisation

High turnover of staff

High proportion of new population within community

History of control failure

Documented procedure (no document control)

One-off competency assessment against procedure

One-off conformance and outcome evaluation

Designed to specific performance criteria (availability, reliability)

Implemented to design criteria

2.

Organisation with well- understood roles and responsibilities

Skilled and trained staff

Community with communication and interaction between all population groups

History of minor control failures

Document control system

Periodic competency assessment against the procedure

Defined performance outcomes

Periodic conformance auditing including management reporting of audit outcomes

Designed in relation to the element at risk to be protected

Managed as part of a preventative maintenance system

System generated notification in the event of activation and failure

3.

Mature organisation with clear and documented roles and responsibilities

Experienced and skilled staff

Well established community with high-level of awareness and/or education involving all population groups

No history of any control failures and demonstrated ability to learn from the past

Management system including rules and protocols (access, authority levels, expected control range)

Continuous performance checks

Management reporting of conformance

Documented management follow-up of deficiencies

Management system subject to external accreditation and auditing

Control covered by a rigorous change management

Deliberate actions required for disabling control

Failures managed as part of maintenance system and given higher priority for resolution

Maintenance system differentiates between critical and non-critical tasks

Documented management follow-up of system deficiencies

5.6.2 Process or Physical Base

Examples: Physical mitigation strategies

Examples: Process mitigation strategies

Structural measures (e.g. levees, infrastructure changes)

Bushfire fuel reduction activities

Physical security measures (e.g. quarantine and border control measures, fences, increased surveillance, changes to locks and access points)

Warning systems

Critical infrastructure protection (CIP) programs

Recruitment/retention of trained emergency management officers (career and volunteer)

Risk assessment and mitigation with relevant stakeholders

Legislation, regulations, Council by-laws

Land-use planning processes including building codes and planning schemes/zones

Protective security processes e.g. information and personnel security

Programs and services that promote public, environmental and psycho-social health

Incentive schemes, and making funding available for emergency management research, training or risk treatments

Insurance, protections, compensation arrangements

Business continuity arrangements

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5.7 Emergency Management Planning Contacts

The following list provides general contact details to support emergency management planning. This list is not designed for use in emergencies.

Prevention-Mitigation

1.

Emergency risk management

State Emergency Service
www.ses.tas.gov.au

2.

Funding programs

State Emergency Service
www.ses.tas.gov.au

3.

Management Authorities
(See Section 2 of this plan)

Service Tasmania 1300 135 513
www.service.tas.gov.au Link to External Site

4.

Protective security information

Special Response—Counter Terrorism Unit, Tasmania Police

Preparedness

5.

Emergency management plans

State Emergency Service
www.ses.tas.gov.au

6.

Management Authorities
(See Section 2 of this plan)

Service Tasmania 1300 135 513
www.service.tas.gov.au Link to External Site

Response

Emergency

7.

Police, Fire, Ambulance

000—mobiles can use 112

8.

Storm and Flood Response

State Emergency Service 132 500

9.

TasNetworks (electricity)

132 004

10.

Hydro Tasmania

1300 360 441

11.

TasGas (gas)

180 2111

12.

State Growth (State roads and bridges)

1800 005 282

13.

Environmental emergency

1800 005 171

14.

ADF JOSS Hobart


15.

National Security Hotline

1800 123 400

16.

AGCCC


17.

Public Health Hotline

1800 671 738

Non-Emergency

18.

Police

131 444
www.police.tas.gov.au/community-alerts Link to External Site

19.

Fire

1800 000 699 or www.fire.tas.gov.au Link to External Site

20.

Ambulance

1800 008 008 or www.dhhs.tas.gov.au Link to External Site

21.

SES

03 6173 2761

Response

Emergency

22.

Poisons Information Centre

131 126

23.

Support Agencies (See Section 2 of this plan)

Service Tasmania 1300 135 513
www.service.tas.gov.au Link to External Site

24.

Translation and Interpreter Services

DIAC 131 450

Recovery

25.

Support Agencies

(See Section 2 of this plan)

Service Tasmania 1300 135 513
www.service.tas.gov.au Link to External Site

26.

Tasmanian Emergency Information Service (TEIS)

1800 567 567 (Diverts to recorded message, if not active/in use)

27.

National Emergency Call Centre

Advised through media releases at the time of the emergency

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5.8 Financial Administration Guide

Cost Capture Overview

5.8.1 Optimising reimbursement following an emergency situation relies on all agencies keeping records of expenditure that readily show eligibility.

5.8.2 Separate financial records are maintained for ‘emergency’ expenditure not only for the purpose of subsequent audit certification but also for later analysis. This is equally important in non-declared situations as current agreements with Department of Treasury and Finance require auditable accounts, if the State is to financially assist agencies that respond to a considerable, but non-declared, emergency event.

5.8.3 To separate financial records, it is recommended that cost centres are kept available for this purpose, and job codes that are likely to be used to capture and differentiate expenditure types during operations are identified. Note that the Department of Treasury and Finance is likely to seek copies of records so that reimbursement of extraordinary financial expenditure can be authorised under the Tasmanian Relief and Recovery Arrangements.

5.8.4 Additionally, all expenditure is to be categorised for reporting purposes, as Category A, B or C.

Expenditure Categories

5.8.5 Category A is emergency expenditure that is given to individuals and families to ease personal hardship or distress arising as a direct result of an emergency caused by a natural disaster. These costs will be incurred in the immediate aftermath of the emergency and will not continue for a long period. This expenditure includes:

a. Emergency food, clothing or temporary accommodation

b. Repair or replacement of essential household items and personal effects

c. Essential repairs to housing, including temporary repairs and repairs to restore housing to a liveable condition

d. Destruction or rebuilding to restore housing to a liveable condition

e. Removal of rubbish from houses to make them safe and liveable

f. Personal and financial counselling to ease personal hardship and distress arising because of the emergency, and

g. Costs of providing this assistance (e.g. evacuation and operation of evacuation centres and recovery centres).

5.8.6 Category B costs include restoration of essential public assets and other acts of relief or restoration, such as the extra ordinary costs of response operations during the emergency. An essential public asset is one that is identified as being essential to the ongoing viability of the community (they may be managed by Government, Government owned or private organisations).

5.8.7 Costs covering staff salaries, wages and associated expenditure, (such as overtime and on-costs) are to be captured where agency or Council staff are redeployed from usual duties for the purposes of supporting response or recovery activities. Such costs can be recorded under both Category A and Category B where, had it not been for the emergency event, they would not have been incurred.

5.8.8 All reported expenditure should be supported by substantiating documentation including the following as appropriate:

a. Invoices

b. Employee timesheets

c. Confirmation of pay rates

d. Internal plant charge rate schedule

e. Details of any insurance recovery or reimbursement

f. Asset register, and

g. General ledger printouts for the natural disaster.

Tasmanian Relief and Recovery Arrangements

The following information is summarised from the Tasmanian Relief and Recovery Arrangements.

Financial Support to Affected Individuals

5.8.9 DHHS has a range of expenditure-related responsibilities to emergency affected people under the Tasmanian Emergency Management Plan including administration of the State Government’s Personal Hardship and Distress Arrangements when the Tasmanian Relief and Recovery Arrangements are activated.

5.8.10 Personal Hardship and Distress Arrangements include Emergency Grants and Recovery and Restoration Grants for individuals and families less able to provide for their own recovery.

Financial Support to Local Government

5.8.11 Where an emergency event has a significant impact on a local Council, the response Management Authority or other appropriate authority will make recommendations to the Premier regarding activation of the Local Government Relief and Recovery package. In making recommendations the following factors are considered, but not limited to:

a. Financial impact on local government

b. Impact on Council owned infrastructure and assets

c. Disruption to Council activities and programs, and

d. Impact on local community.

5.8.12 Following activation, assistance is available when a Council’s expenditure on eligible relief and recovery measures exceeds its first threshold. More assistance is available if the Council’s second threshold is passed.

5.8.13 The thresholds are calculated in the same way as under the NDRRA. A Council’s first expenditure threshold is 0.225 per cent of its total general rates revenue and general purpose grants receipts two financial years prior and its second threshold is 1.75 times that amount. A Council will be reimbursed 50 per cent of its eligible expenditure between the first and second thresholds and 75 per cent of expenditure on eligible expenditure above the second threshold.

Recovery Funds

5.8.14 Where a community is severely affected, the State and Australian Governments may activate Recovery modules to provide financial assistance to small businesses, primary producers and not-for-profit organisations. A recovery fund may also be established to support recovery initiatives. In general, such measures will be jointly activated and announced by the Premier and Prime Minister.

5.8.15 Where a community has been severely affected by an emergency, the response Management Authority or other appropriate authority will make recommendations to the Premier regarding appropriateness of activation of the recovery arrangements based on damage assessments conducted.

5.8.16 Under these arrangements, DPIPWE (primary producers), State Growth (small business and not-for-profit organisations), and the Department of Treasury and Finance (Recovery Funds) administer clean-up and assistance grants.

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5.9 Common Incident Control System (CICS)

5.9.1 In 2012, a Common Incident Control System (CICS) was adopted by Management Authorities in Tasmania and is applicable to both response and recovery operations.

5.9.2 For recovery operations, the title Incident Controller should be substituted with the title Recovery Coordinator (or similar), in line with the State Special Emergency Management Plan for Recovery.

5.9.3 CICS identifies those functions and responsibilities that are fundamental to emergency management in Tasmania. They include, but are not limited to:

Incident control

(command & control)

As a function: Take charge and exercise leadership of the response to and/or recovery from the incident, including the establishment of a management structure.

Safety

As a responsibility of the Incident Controller: Apply a risk management approach and ensure a safe working environment, safe systems and safe equipment are utilised to protect the health and safety of staff involved in the resolution of, and/or recovery from the incident.

Communication (liaison)

As a responsibility of the Incident Controller: Ensure effective liaison, communication and cooperation within the Management Authority and with all others involved in the resolution of, or recovery from, the incident.

Recovery

As a responsibility of the Incident Controller: Ensure relief and recovery considerations are addressed to ensure services are provided to the persons and community impacted by the incident, and arrange for a smooth transition during the recovery phase, if applicable.

Intelligence

As a function: Continually assess the situation, conduct analysis, identify risk and share information in support of all decision-making.

Planning

As a function: Determine the mission and develop the overall plan to support the objectives and strategies for the resolution of, and/or recovery from, the incident.

Operations

As a function: Implement the incident action plan developed to resolve and/or recover from the incident and monitor its activities and progress.

Logistics

As a function: Obtain and maintain human and physical resources, facilities, services and materials.

Public information

As a function: Provide timely and accurate public information in order to protect and reassure the community.

Investigation

As a function: Facilitate the investigation of the incident and if required, review the response activities.

5.9.4 Diagram 1: The following structure is included for illustration purposes only and provides an example of how CICS may be applied. This scenario represents a full-scale deployment with all functions delegated (refer to 5.9.10 b).

CICS model

The Purpose of CICS

5.9.5 The purpose of implementing a common incident control system in Tasmania is to:

a. Promote a common approach to emergency management in Tasmania (all hazards)

b. Provide Tasmania with a jurisdictional incident management framework

c. Enhance interoperability when the need arises for personnel from multiple agencies to work together

d. Help ensure the key elements of incident management are considered and, where appropriate, are applied by Management Authorities and recovery organisations

e. Ensure emergency management training and education is consistent across agencies

f. Provide a basis to review incident response and recovery in Tasmania, and

g. Provide a framework for the implementation of an electronic information management system across Government agencies.

Implementation of CICS

5.9.6 All Response Management Authorities and recovery organisations must be in a position to implement an effective incident management system during the management of an emergency.

5.9.7 It is acknowledged that Management Authorities and recovery organisations have invested significant resources in developing emergency management plans, standard operating procedures, and training and exercise regimes that are aligned to their preferred incident control/management system. Examples being the Australasian Inter-service Incident Management System (AIIMS) and the Australian New Zealand Counter Terrorism Committee Incident Command and Control System known as ICCS Plus.

5.9.8 It is not intended that Management Authorities and recovery organisations disregard that investment, but rather consider the CICS functions and responsibilities when engaged in emergency management activities across Preparedness, Response and Recovery (i.e. planning, training, exercising and deployment).

Incident Management: Key Principles

5.9.9 The incident management system applied must be based on three key principles:

a. Management by Objectives: A process of consultative management where the Incident Controller, in consultation with the Incident Management Team, determines the desired outcomes of the incident

b. Functional Management: Utilisation of specific functions to manage an incident e.g. Control > Planning > Public Information > Operations > Logistics, and

c. Span of Control: The concept relating to the number of groups or individuals that can be successfully supervised by one person. Where span of control is exceeded, supervising officers should consider delegating responsibilities to others.

Incident Management: Concepts

5.9.10 The incident management system applied should consider the following concepts:

a. Delegation: The incident management system should provide a structure and process of delegation to ensure that all vital functions and responsibilities are adequately performed. Depending on the size or complexity of an incident, the Incident Controller can perform all of the functions or delegate one or more functions as required.

i. Delegation is defined as the assignment of functions and tasks to others together with the necessary authority, freedom of action and resources to complete the task. The person delegating retains accountability but is no longer responsible for undertaking the actual task.

5.9.11 Flexibility and scalability: The Incident Controller need only apply functions to the extent that they are necessary under the circumstances, however a function should only be discounted after an assessment has been made of the situation.

i. Whether Intelligence is applied as a stand-alone function or as a unit within Planning is a decision for the Incident Controller. This applies equally to Investigation: It can be a stand-alone function or a unit within Operations.

Incident Classification Model

5.9.12 AIIMS utilises an Incident Classification model which identifies three levels of incident response from one to three, in ascending order of complexity:

a. Level 1 incident: Can be resolved through the use of local or initial response resources.

b. Level 2 incident: Is more complex either in size, resources or risk. It is characterised by the need for deployment of resources beyond the initial response, or the sectorisation of the incident, or the establishment of functional sections due to the level of complexity, or a combination of these.

c. Level 3 incident: Is characterised by the degree of complexity that may require the establishment of Divisions for effective management of the situation. These incidents will usually involve the delegation of functions.

5.9.13 Should a Management Authority or recovery organisation apply an Incident Classification Model, it should be consistent with the AIIMS model.

Multi-Agency Operations

5.9.14 For incidents requiring a multi-agency response, the Incident Controller will be appointed by the relevant Management Authority as detailed in this Plan.

5.9.15 To avoid confusion between response and recovery activities, recovery should not utilise the term Incident Controller, but the title Recovery Coordinator or similar.

5.9.16 Similarly, support agencies are not to use the title Incident Controller (including tabards). The senior officer of any support agency present is encouraged to adopt generic terminology, such as Fire Commander and Ambulance Commander. As a result of arrangements detailed in the National Counter Terrorism Handbook, Tasmania Police will continue to use the title ‘Police Forward Commander’.

5.9.17 In addition to commanding the Management Authority’s resources, the Incident Controller has the added responsibility of controlling and coordinating the support agencies present. Under those circumstances, CICS recognises the Incident Controller’s responsibility to:

a. Establish and maintain effective communication with all agencies and organisations involved (generally through liaison), and

b. Ensure safe systems and safe equipment are utilised to protect the health and safety of all personnel involved.

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5.10 Response Centre Arrangements

5.10.1 Emergency Operations Centres and Emergency Coordination Centres

The main differences between the functions carried out at Emergency Operations Centres and Emergency Coordination Centres in Tasmania are identified below.

Emergency Operation Centre

Emergency Coordination Centre

Sets objectives, determines strategies and tactics to resolve the emergency or certain aspects of it.

Sets objectives, determines strategies and tactics to resolve consequences of the emergency (can be agency specific, multi-hazard or whole-of-government/community focused).

Allocates, deploys and manages resources for response to the emergency.

Allocates, deploys and manages resources to address consequences from the emergency.

Usually agency specific and typically the response Management Authority is most likely to establish an EOC.

Usually staffed by a range of agency Liaison Officers.

Provides media information about the emergency.

May provide public information about the consequences of the emergency.

5.10.2 Emergency Coordination Centre Arrangements

The general arrangements for coordination centres managed by emergency management committees established by The Act are summarised below:

Details

Municipal Emergency Coordination Centre

Regional Emergency Coordination Centre

State Crisis Centre

Requested/

recommended by

Senior Officer for the response Management Authority AND/OR the Municipal Coordinator

Senior Officer for the response Management Authority AND/OR Regional Controller

Senior Officer for the response Management Authority AND/OR State Controller

Opened and closed by

Municipal Coordinator

SES Regional Manager

State Controller

Usually assisted by

Municipal Committee members and Councils

Police Regional Committee

DPAC
SES
Special Response & Counter Terrorism Unit

Primary location

Refer to Municipal Plans

Refer to Regional Plans

Hobart

Notification provided to

Municipal Committee members
Regional SES Duty Officer

Regional Committee
Director SES

SEMC/SEMAG
Ministerial Committee
(if activated)
Regional Controllers
AGCCC

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5.11 Summary of Australian Defence Force Arrangements: DFACA and DACC

Defence Assistance to the Civil Community (DACC)

5.11.1 Assistance under DACC is classified in 6 categories and is either for emergency (Categories 1-3) or non-emergency situations (Categories 4-6). A summary of these categories is provided below for information only, as requests should not be made specifically for assistance under the DACC arrangements. Generally, any requests for Commonwealth assistance should be focused on the outcome for which the jurisdiction is seeking assistance. The relevant Commonwealth agency will identify the appropriate arrangement/s that apply.

5.11.2 Specifically, assistance provided under DACC provisions is managed using COMDISPLAN arrangements. The provision of this assistance is underpinned by a set of principles that are considered each time a request is made by the Commonwealth. These are based on the Commonwealth being satisfied that the jurisdiction’s resources and capability are likely to be inadequate and/or exhausted in response/recovery operations (i.e. assistance under DACC is the exception, not the rule).

Defence Force Aid to the Civil Authority (DFACA)

5.11.3 DFACA is the provision of Australian Defence Force assistance to civil law enforcement authorities (e.g. Police) in the performance of law enforcement tasks. Most commonly used for counter terrorism, DFACA arrangements can also be used for other purposes. In certain circumstances, Australian Defence Force personnel employed on DFACA tasking may be armed and authorised to use lethal force.

5.11.4 Requests for assistance under DFACA are made in writing to the authorising Ministers (the Prime Minister, the Minister for Defence and the Attorney-General) by the Premier, through the Commissioner or Deputy Commissioner of Police. The Director State Emergency Service should also be informed of any DFACA requests to allow for coordination with any other requests for Commonwealth assistance, and further communications (where information security conditions permit).

DACC Categories 1-6 Emergency and Non-Emergency Assistance

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

NON-EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

Details

Category 1

Category 2

Category 3

Category 4

Category 5

Category 6

What
it’s for

Emergency assistance of a minor nature (i.e. can be provided from local military commander’s own resources)

Emergency assistance beyond Category 1

Assistance associated with managing consequences of the emergency

Non- emergency assistance

Non-emergency assistance of a minor nature (i.e. can be provided from local military commander’s own resources)

Non- emergency assistance to civil authorities e.g. Police

When it can be requested

Localised emergency situations that directly threaten life or property and support is not expected to be required for more than 24 hours

Continuing/ more extensive emergency operations where support is anticipated to be required for more than 24 hours

Assistance is not directly related to the saving of life or property, but can be requested as an extension of Category 2 assistance

Various, including assistance with law enforcement tasks.

Tasmanian Liaison

Senior Officer for response Management Authority

Director State Emergency Service

Director State Emergency Service

Director State Emergency Service

Director State Emergency Service

State Controller or delegate

Defence Liaison

Manager Joint Operation Support Staff (JOSS) Anglesea Barracks, Hobart

Emergency Management Australia, AGD

Emergency Management Australia, AGD

Emergency Management Australia, AGD

Manager, Joint Operation Support Staff (JOSS) Anglesea Barracks, Hobart

Emergency Management Australia, AGD

Cost Recovery

Not required

Not required

Required

Required

Required

Required

Other Notes

Advice of assistance must be provided to the Director State Emergency Service

N/A

State must meet indemnity and insurance requirements

Requesting organisation must meet indemnity and insurance requirements. Advice of assistance should be provided to the Director State Emergency Service.

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5.12 National Principles for Disaster Recovery

These principles were endorsed by the Community and Disability Services Ministers’ Advisory Council, prior to being accepted by the Australian Emergency Management Committee in April 2008.

1.Successful recovery is based on an understanding of the community context.

2.Successful recovery acknowledges the complex and dynamic nature of emergencies and communities.

3.Successful recovery is responsive and flexible, engaging communities and empowering them to move forward.

4.Successful recovery requires a planned, coordinated and adaptive approach based on continuing assessment of impacts and needs.

5.Successful recovery is built on effective communication with affected communities and other stakeholders.

6.Successful recovery recognises, supports and builds community, individual and organisational capacity.

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5.13 Memorandum of Understanding
(MoU) Model Template

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

BETWEEN THE

STATE GOVERNMENT AGENCY
(DETAILS)

AND

COMMUNITY SECTOR ORGANISATION
(DETAILS)

FOR

THE PROVISION OF XXXX

LOGOS

 

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

between

STATE GOVERNMENT AGENCY DETAILS

and

COMMUNITY SECTOR ORGANISATION DETAILS

The purpose of this Memorandum of Understanding is to outline arrangements between the Department of XXX and Community Sector Organisation Details for the provision of XXX to support Tasmanian communities during and following an emergency

A. PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

1. The Department of insert name of State Government Agency has the responsibility under the Tasmanian Emergency Management Plan to provide insert details of the function.

2. The Department of insert name of State Government Agency recognises the need for support from other areas of Government and the community sector to provide this service to the Tasmanian community.

3. To assist with the provision of the insert detail of the service/support provided, the insert name of community sector organisation has agreed to provide the insert name of State Government Agency with detail the type of support.

4. The insert name of community sector organisation provides detail the type of service to the Tasmanian community.

5. The parties have agreed to enter into this Memorandum of Understanding in order to determine their various responsibilities and obligations in relation to the insert detail the type of support.

6. In undertaking this function both parties agree to adhere to the policies, procedures and plans set out in the Tasmanian Emergency Management Arrangements as documented by the Emergency Management Act 2006 and/ or authorised by the State Emergency Management Committee

7. This Memorandum of Understanding has been developed by the parties by agreement.

 

THE PARTIES AGREE:

Nominated Officers

8. To nominate appropriate officers from within their respective organisations (name of the nominated officers from each organisation) for the purpose of implementing their obligations under this Memorandum of Understanding.

9. Each Nominated Officer will ensure the facilitation of information flow between the parties and at all levels within their organisation and be aware of emergency management arrangements in Tasmania.

Term

10. This Memorandum of Understanding shall apply for a period of provide details commencing on insert date and concluding on insert date.

Organisational Specific Commitment

11. Insert Name of State Government Agency

The insert Name of State Government Agency intends to

This section details the specific details of the support provided and may include:

Regular meetings with the Community Sector Organisations

The provision of timely and appropriate information

Planning support

Information of upcoming training and relevant exercises

12. Insert Name of Community Sector Organisation

The insert Name of Community Sector Organisation intends to

This section details the specific details of the support provided and may include:

Details of the service

The development of plans and arrangements to provide the service

Contact lists

Any training for volunteers to carry out their commitments in this MoU

Location of any services – municipality/Statewide

 

Funding Arrangements

13. This section to detail any funding arrangements for the delivery of the service including the provision of certified accounts to Government for goods purchased and services provided

Review

14. The nominated officers shall commence a review of this MoU specify a date.

Dispute Resolution

15. As the purpose of this Memorandum of Understanding is to outline cooperative working arrangements between Insert Name of State Government Agency and Insert Name of Community Sector Organisation, the parties intend, should grievances arise, that they will in good faith attempt to settle by negotiation any dispute.

Intention to Bind

16. The parties desire that this Memorandum of Understanding will foster the spirit of co-operation which exists between them in respect to reaching and formalising the support by name of community sector organisation to the State of Tasmania and each acknowledges that it is not legally binding and is not intended to be an agreement enforceable in a Court of Law.

Notice

17. If any party decides to review its commitments pursuant to this Memorandum of Understanding, they must notify the other party of that decision within 10 business days of that decision.

Confidentiality

18. The parties intend to keep confidential any information marked “confidential” by any other party and intend not to disclose it to any third party or use it other than for the purposed of the Memorandum or as authorised in writing by the other party.

 



EXECUTION PAGE

Executed as an agreement:

DATED this……………………day of……………………20…………………


SIGNED for and on behalf of the )

Name of Government Agency )

TASMANIA as an authorised representative )…………………………………

In the presence of: ) Signature of authorised person


Signature of witness )

Name of witness (block letters) )

Address and occupation of witness )


SIGNED for and on behalf of the )

Name of Community Sector Organisation )

As an authorised representative ) ……………………………………

In the presence of: ) Signature of authorised person


Signature of witness )

Name of witness (block letters) )

Address and occupation of witness )

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