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Section Two - Governance and Management

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Principle | Overview | Current Tasmanian Arrangements | Roles and Responsibilities | Responsibilities Summary   

Principle

2.1 Clarity of governance arrangements and identification of roles and responsibilities for emergency management minimises duplication, conflict and disconnects and optimises interoperability.

Overview

Role of Government and Emergency Management Partners

2.2 In Australia, the three spheres of government (Australian, state and local) work in partnership to achieve safer, sustainable communities through robust emergency management arrangements. Appendix 5.2 differentiates the roles of government for emergency management.

2.3 Relationships between the three spheres of government along with Non-Government Organisations (NGOs), industry as well as individual owners/managers of property/premises are increasingly important for planning and operational aspects of emergency management that support community resilience.

2.4 Individuals and their communities have a significant role in this work as they support voluntary activities and organisations, provide representation in Councils and retain the primary responsibility for their own safety, including preparedness for emergencies.

Legal Framework

2.5 The majority of emergency management responsibilities and authorities for specified hazards and functions are identified in a range of legislation and regulations (including Australian Government). Appendix 5.3 provides a summary of these.

2.6 Specific arrangements relating to counter terrorism are provided by a combination of state and Australian legislation. Relevant Tasmanian legislation includes the Terrorism (Commonwealth Powers) Act 2002, Police Powers (Public Safety) Act 2005 and Terrorism (Preventative Detention) Act 2005.

2.7 Significant additional powers and authorities for emergency management are provided in The Act. The Act establishes a flexible emergency management system, including emergency powers, by the appointment of workers for emergency management functions, including Municipal Coordinators and Regional Controllers and the State Controller.

2.8 This system is designed to provide for scalable and flexible emergency management (especially response and recovery operations), and a safer Tasmania. Responsibility for administration of The Act is allocated to the Department of Police and Emergency Management (Section 65). If conflict arises between the powers and authorities provided in different State legislation, The Act prevails.

2.9 Part 2 of the Emergency Management Act 2006 establishes the broad governance framework for emergency management to be applied in three regions: North-West, Northern and Southern (which are specified groupings of municipal Council areas).

Governance Administration Arrangements

2.10 Emergency management activities are overseen by the State, Regional and Municipal Emergency Management Committees and their sub-committees. Their main functions are described later in this section and Appendix 5.4 outlines typical membership and reporting lines for them. Some State sub-committees also have active relationships with national committees and groups.

2.11 Emergency Management Committees and sub-committees are required to maintain a Terms of Reference (ToR), and work program where appropriate. ToRs are to be maintained in line with the model structure shown in Appendix 5.4 and are accepted using the committee reporting model in the same appendix. The Committees and sub-committees current at the time this plan was issued are also listed in Appendix 5.4. After ToR is accepted they are made available on the SES website.

2.12 The SES provides executive support to SEMC and the Regional Committees, and Municipal Coordinators provide executive support to Municipal Committees. The Chairs of each sub-committee are responsible for managing their operation and administration (this includes making arrangements for resourcing the Executive Officer function), as well as arranging for ToR to be maintained and accepted by the relevant committee.

Current Management Responsibilities

2.13 Owners/managers have overall responsibility for the safety and security of their property/premises. This includes, but is not limited to:

a. Maintaining effective arrangements for requesting assistance

b. Maintaining emergency management capabilities and arrangements that will be compatible with relevant Government organisations (when additional assistance/coordination is required), and

c. Resuming their ongoing responsibilities for the property/premises after response has ended (i.e. when the emergency has been resolved).

2.14 A variety of State Government agencies and other organisations have defined responsibilities for emergency management, protective security and counter terrorism activities. These are shown in Tables 4-6 and are current at the time of issue of this plan.

2.15 Emergency management activities are usually undertaken by referring to agreed arrangements described in
hazard or function-specific plans. A summary list of plans current at the time of approval of this plan is included in Appendix 5.5. This includes specific arrangements relating to counter terrorism from the NCTP and National Counter Terrorism Handbook. Where specific plans are not maintained, the arrangements in this plan can be used, and may be complemented by national plans.

2.16 Response and recovery arrangements are implemented applying Incident Control Systems (e.g. AIIMS) in a coordinated effort. Nationally, there is current consideration related to the development and adoption of a national incident management system to optimise interoperability.

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Current Tasmanian Arrangements

Consultation Framework

2.17 Figure 1 shows the current consultation framework that supports governance and management of emergency management in Tasmania.

Figure 1: Consultation Framework for Tasmanian Emergency Management

Consultation framework flowchart

Ministerial Committee

2.18 Section 12 of The Act provides the authority for the Premier to convene a Ministerial Committee for emergency management, as required. This could occur for any number of reasons, including operations that have escalated to State-level, or specific validation activities (e.g. a national exercise).

State Emergency Management Committee (SEMC)

2.19 State emergency management activities are overseen by the SEMC, which is chaired by the State Controller (Commissioner of Police) and supported by the Executive Officer (Director, SES).

2.20 Membership of the SEMC includes the State Controller, Secretary Department of Premier and Cabinet (DPAC), Secretary Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Co-Chairs of the State Emergency Management Advisory Group, Chief Officer Tasmania Fire Service (TFS), Chief Executive Officer Ambulance Tasmania (AT), and the Executive Officer.

2.21 The functions and powers of the SEMC are detailed in Section 9 of the Emergency Management Act 2006. In summary, the SEMC is to:

a. Institute and coordinate policy, arrangements and strategies for State-level emergency management (this includes maintaining the Tasmanian Emergency Management Plan and any related State
emergency plans)

b. Coordinate/oversee the management of emergencies that affect more than one region and other emergencies the SEMC considers appropriate, and

c. Identify and promote opportunities for improvement in emergency management. This can include imposing functions on the Regional Committees and State sub-committees.

2.22 The Strategic Directions Framework 2013-2018 (the Framework) is to provide a longer-term strategy for the SEMC. The Framework articulates four Strategic Directions to assist the SEMC in achieving the outcomes of the Framework. This approach enables:

a. Shared understanding and responsibility across the emergency management stakeholders and the community

b. An emergency management framework based on risk-based planning, and

c. More resilient communities that are better prepared for, able to respond to, and recover from emergencies.

Security and Emergency Management Advisory Group (SEMAG)

2.23 SEMAG is an advisory group to the SEMC. It is responsible for assisting the SEMC by providing policy advice relating to security and emergency management.

2.24 It comprises the Deputy Secretaries of most State Government departments or their principal advisers. It is co-chaired by the Deputy Commissioner of Tasmania Police and the Deputy Secretary of the DPAC.

2.25 SEMAG’s main functions is to:

a. Provide strategic policy advice to the SEMC regarding:

Priorities for reducing the risk to Tasmania from emergencies

Effective security and emergency management capabilities, and

The status and adequacy of security and emergency management plans and arrangements.

b. Advise the SEMC on matters relating to The Act

c. Contribute to the development of national security and emergency management arrangements, mainly by supporting Tasmania’s representatives on the Australia New Zealand Emergency Management Committee (ANZEMC) and the Australia New Zealand Counter Terrorism Committee (ANZCTC)

d. Inform the priorities of the whole-of-government activities of State Government agencies involved in security and emergency management, and

e. Support whole-of-government response and recovery activities as described in the State Crisis Centre Operations manual

Regional Emergency Management Committees (Regional Committees)

2.26 Regional emergency management activities are coordinated by Regional Committees, which are chaired by the Regional Controller (Western, Northern, and Southern District Commanders from TASPOL), and supported by the SES Regional Managers (North-West, Northern and Southern regions), as the Executive Officers.

2.27 Membership of Regional Committees usually includes senior representatives of emergency services, Municipal Coordinators, Recovery representatives, other Government agencies and enterprises, utilities and relevant volunteer organisations/Non-Government Organisations.

2.28 The functions and powers of the Regional Committees are detailed in Section 16 of The Act. In summary they are to:

a. Institute and coordinate policy, arrangements and strategies for regional emergency management (this includes maintaining the Regional Emergency Management Plan and any related regional sub-plans)

b. Coordinate/oversee the management of emergencies that affect the region, and support neighbouring regions where able, and

c. Review the management of emergencies that have occurred in the region to identify and promote opportunities for improved emergency management. This can include imposing functions on the Municipal Committees, assisting neighbouring Regional Committees, reporting to the SEMC and proactively engaging with stakeholders to enhance regional emergency management arrangements.

Municipal Emergency Management Committees (Municipal Committees)

2.29 Municipal emergency management activities are coordinated by Municipal Committees and supported by the Municipal Coordinators (as Executive Officers). The Municipal Coordinator is appointed by the Minister under Section 23 of the Emergency Management Act 2006 and the position is held by a person nominated by Council (usually a staff member).

2.30 Membership of Municipal Committees usually includes staff and elected officials of the relevant Council (including the Deputy Coordinator and the Recovery Coordinators), senior representatives of municipal emergency services, other Government agencies and enterprises, utilities and relevant volunteer organisations/Non-Government Organisations.

2.31 The functions and powers of the Municipal Committees are detailed in Section 22 of The Act. In summary they are to:

a. Institute and coordinate policy, arrangements and strategies for municipal emergency management (this includes maintaining the Municipal Emergency Management Plan and any related municipal sub-plans)

b. Coordinate/oversee the management of emergencies that affect the municipality and support neighbouring Councils where able, and

c. Review the management of emergencies that have occurred in the municipal or combined area to identify and promote opportunities for improved emergency management. This can include assisting the Municipal Chairperson, Municipal Coordinators (emergency management and recovery) and other Municipal Committees, as well as reporting to the Regional Committee and proactively engaging with stakeholders to enhance municipal emergency management arrangements.

Emergency Management Sub-committees (State, regional and municipal)

2.32 The Act provides authority for emergency management committees to establish/recognise groups as sub-committees. Their membership usually includes subject matter experts (in content/operations) and/or policy/planning advisers. Sub-committees usually focus their attention on identified hazards and/or emergency management functions.

2.33 The usual functions of sub-committees are to:

a. Undertake, coordinate or oversee emergency management work that may be routine/ongoing, or project based (this can include providing advice for plans)

b. Support the committee to set emergency management priorities, and

c. Promote opportunities for improved emergency management, including checking that plans and arrangements are interoperable.

2.34 Reporting lines for sub-committees are shown in Appendix 5.4. Collaborative relationships are also often maintained between sub-committees at different levels (e.g. Regional Recovery Committees collaborate with the State Recovery Committee).

Other Stakeholder and Advisory Groups

2.35 Other groups exist (often established by other legislation or administrative arrangements) at national, state and regional levels to support emergency management activities. These groups provide advice to governments, forums, committees/other groups as required, and they can be recognised as sub-committees under The Act.

Affected Area Recovery Committee

2.36 Affected Area Recovery Committees can be established under the authority of The Act to assist affected Council/s coordinate longer term recovery activities.

2.37 They are usually chaired by the Mayor and membership usually includes local and regional/State representatives related to affected communities, services, conditions and assets.

2.38 The main function of the Affected Area Recovery Committee is to provide a management structure for coordinated recovery activities, and facilitate timely communication and consultation with the community about the recovery effort.

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Roles and Responsibilities

Overview

2.39 In addition to the ongoing responsibilities of owners/managers for property/premises, three general management roles are assigned to agencies/organisations so that Tasmanian emergency management needs are met. These are:

a. SEMC Advisory Agencies provide advice to State Government about emergency management arrangements or the adequacy of arrangements for identified hazards across the PPRR spectrum (this is not an operational role)

b. Management Authorities provide direction so that capability is maintained for identified hazards across the PPRR spectrum, and

c. Supporting Agencies maintain specific functional capabilities that are likely to be called on by Management Authorities.

2.40 Tables 4-6 in this section show current roles and responsibilities for Tasmanian emergency management.

SEMC Advisory Agency

2.41 SEMC Advisory Agencies are responsible for providing advice to the SEMC on the adequacy of arrangements in Tasmania for prevention and mitigation, preparedness and response arrangements for identified hazards. This can include, but is not limited to activities and capabilities maintained by relevant Management Authorities and Support Agencies, identification of trends, emerging issues and/or gaps.

Management Authority

2.42 Management Authorities are responsible for coordinating and providing guidance for aspects of comprehensive emergency management (e.g. preparedness Management Authority for biosecurity emergencies). Management Authority activities can range from providing advice as required to actively coordinating and aligning effort between relevant emergency management partners (e.g. Government agencies and enterprises, Councils, utilities and relevant volunteer organisations). These variations are due to a range of factors including, but not limited to: available research, relative maturity of current capacity/capability, resource constraints/allocation decisions, complementary initiatives and other priorities. Management Authority roles across the PPRR spectrum are broadly described as follows:

Prevention and Mitigation

Maintains strategic oversight of the relevant research, risk assessment and risk reduction activities within Tasmania across all levels of Government. This can include, but is
not limited to:

Providing information on hazards to the Tasmanian Government so priorities can be set for risk reduction activities, and

Supporting Councils, critical infrastructure owners and other organisations in hazard research and risk assessment activities.

Preparedness

Maintains strategic oversight of, and can provide planned and coordinated measures for: emergency planning, validation, capacity building, response capability, and community education within Tasmania across all levels of Government so safe and effective response and recovery can occur. This can include, but is not limited to:

Maintaining special plans, sub-plans or other associated plans, and

Evaluating and reporting on needs and deficiencies identified during validations.

Response

Deploys and controls resources to save lives, protect property and the environment, and preserve the social and economic structure of the community. This can include, but is not limited to: dissemination of warnings, gaining and maintaining situational awareness, activating and deploying resources and capabilities, coordinating response actions and flow of operational information (including supporting initial recovery), and arranging deactivation/stand down.

Recovery

Provides support to ensure short-term relief needs of communities are met with regard to immediate shelter, food and clothing as well the longer-term process of restoration to a stable post-event condition. Management Authorities are not allocated for recovery, as it is not hazard-specific. Councils hold primary responsibility for recovery and they are assisted by REMCs and a variety of State Government agencies as required.

Support Agency

Primary Support Agency

2.43 The role of a Primary Support Agency can include, but is not limited to:

a. Providing functional support for activities across the PPRR spectrum (this can include providing workers, goods and services especially for operations)

b. Requesting assistance from and coordinating efforts with Assisting Support Agencies and other organisations to maximise use of all available resources

c. Providing advice of progress to the Management Authority and Assisting Support Agencies (e.g. situation reports, progress reports)

d. Coordinating agency specific planning and preparation for performing functions in the short term, as well as over extended periods in partnership with Assisting Support Agencies. This can include, but is not limited to: development of supporting operational plans/orders/SOPs/checklists/protocols, training, procurement, equipment and supplies maintenance, and

e. Identifying ways to improve the EM capacity of the agency.

Assisting Support Agency

2.44 Assisting Support Agencies have specific capabilities or resources that complement the Primary Support Agency in delivering the relevant support function. The role of the Assisting Support Agencies can include, but is not limited to:

a. Providing functional support for activities across the PPRR spectrum (this can include providing workers, goods and services especially for operations) when requested by a Primary Support Agency or an Emergency Coordination or Operations Centre

b. Providing advice of progress to the Primary Support Agency/Management Authority (e.g. situation reports, progress reports)

c. Coordinating agency specific planning and preparation for performing functions in the short term, as well as over extended periods in partnership with Primary/other Assisting Support Agencies. This can include, but is not limited to: development of supporting operational plans/orders/SOPs/checklists/protocols, training, procurement, equipment and supplies maintenance etc., and

d. Identifying ways to improve the EM capacity of the agency.

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Responsibilities Summary

SEMC Advisory Agencies and Management Authorities

2.45 Table 4 identifies the SEMC Advisory Agencies and Management Authorities for identified hazards in the Tasmanian emergency management context. Generally, these responsibilities (SEMC Advisory Agency and Management Authority) rest with State Government agencies to enhance and complement the extant capabilities and arrangements maintained by owners/managers of property/premises. It is acknowledged that addressing the responsibilities listed in Table 4 is often dependent on support from, and collaboration with, other organisations including Councils, Non-Government Organisations, industry and other Support Agencies.

2.46 The hazard groups listed in this table are not intended to be exhaustive, and changes to them can be made by agreement through the consultation framework over the life of this plan. They can also be altered as required during emergencies.

2.47 As recovery functions apply to all hazards, associated responsibilities are listed separately in Table 5.

2.48 Legend:

--- Means that the responsibility for SEMC Advisory Agency or Management Authority is not currently allocated.

* Provides an overriding reminder that Tasmania Police become responsible for the control of the scene and investigation of deaths that may occur in the emergency.

Table 4: SEMC Advisory Agencies and Management Authorities for Hazards

Row

Hazard

SEMC Advisory

Agency

Management Authority

Prevention

and Mitigation

Preparedness

Response*

1.

Biosecurity emergencies (disease, weeds and pests affecting animals and plants)

DPIPWE

DPIPWE – Biosecurity Tasmania

DPIPWE – Biosecurity Tasmania

DPIPWE – Biosecurity Tasmania

2.

Coastal erosion

DPIPWE

DPIPWE – Resource Management and Conservation Division

DoJ – Land-use Planning

---

3.

Coastal Inundation – Storm Tide

DPIPWE

DPIPWE – Resource
Management and
Conservation
Division

DPEM

DPEM

4.

Earthquake

State Growth

State Growth –
Mineral Resources Tasmania

SES

TASPOL

5.

Energy supply emergency

(includes petroleum, gas and electricity. Excludes: energy infrastructure failures)

State Growth

State Growth –
Infrastructure Tasmania

State Growth –
Infrastructure Tasmania

State Growth –
Infrastructure Tasmania

6.

Marine Pollution

DPIPWE

DPIPWE – EPA Division

DPIPWE – EPA Division

DPIPWE – EPA Division

7.

Fire – national parks and other reserves

TFS

DPIPWE – Parks

DPIPWE – Parks

DPIPWE – Parks

8.

Fire – declared forest land/State forest

TFS

Forestry Tasmania

Forestry Tasmania

Forestry Tasmania

9.

Fire – urban and privately managed rural land

TFS

TFS

TFS

TFS

10.

Flood-dams –
dam safety emergencies

DPIPWE

DPIPWE –
Water Resources
Division

DPIPWE –
Water Resources
Division

TASPOL –
(Assisted by dam owner)

11

Flood – flash flood

SES

Councils

SES

SES

12.

Flood – rivers

SES

Councils

SES

SES

13.

Food contamination

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

14.

Hazardous materials

TFS

DoJ

TFS

TFS

15.

Hazardous materials – radiological (unintentional release of)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

TASPOL

16.

Heatwave Incident

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

17.

Influenza pandemic

DPAC

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DPAC

DHHS (Public Health Services)

18.

Infrastructure failure – building collapse

TASPOL

DoJ –
Building Standards & Occupational Licensing

TFS

TASPOL

19.

Infrastructure failure – State roads and bridges

State Growth

State Growth –
Traffic Infrastructure Services

State Growth –
Traffic Infrastructure Services

State Growth –
Traffic Infrastructure Services

20.

Intentional violence (e.g. CBRN attacks, sieges, terrorist events)

TASPOL

TASPOL

TASPOL

TASPOL

21.

Landslip, landslide

State Growth

State Growth Mineral Resources Tasmania

Councils

TASPOL

22.

Nuclear powered warship visits

SES

Commonwealth regulated

SES

TASPOL

23.

Public health emergency

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

24.

Space debris

SES

SES

SES

TASPOL

25.

Storm, high winds,

tempest

SES

SES

SES

SES

26.

Transport crash – aviation (less than 1000m from the airport runway)

TASPOL

Commonwealth regulated

Commonwealth regulated

On-Site Agencies (e.g. Airservices Australia.)
TASPOL

27.

Transport crash – aviation (more than 1000m from the airport runway)

TASPOL

Commonwealth regulated

TASPOL

TASPOL

28.

Transport crash – marine
(no environmental emergency)

MAST

MAST

MAST

TASPOL

29.

Transport crash – railway

State Growth

Rail Operator

Rail Operator

TASPOL, TFS

30.

Transport crash –road vehicles

TASPOL

State Growth –
Traffic Infrastructure Services

State Growth –
Traffic Infrastructure Services

TASPOL

31.

Tsunami

SES

SES

DPEM

DPEM

32.

Water supply contamination

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DHHS (Public Health Services)

Recovery Responsibilities

2.49 Table 5 summarises responsibilities for recovery functions related to social, economic, infrastructure and environmental aspects.

2.50 Variations may occur for recovery between regions due to the capacity of Councils and the presence (or otherwise) of State Government agencies and other organisations. For specific regional arrangements refer to the Regional Emergency Management Plan.

2.51 The functions listed in this table are not intended to be exhaustive and changes to them can be made by agreement through the consultation framework over the life of this plan. They can also be altered as required during emergencies.

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Table 5: Recovery Responsibilities

Row

Function

Support Agency

Primary

Assisting

1.

Social recovery (Coordination of immediate service requirements)
- Municipal

Municipal Recovery Coordinators

NGOs

Relevant State Service agencies

2.

Social recovery (Coordination of immediate service requirements) – Regional/State

Regional Social Recovery Coordinators

Councils

NGOs

DHHS

THS

a.

Accommodation (emergency)

DHHS

Councils

State Growth

b.

Appeals management

DPAC

Councils

Red Cross

c.

Care for children

DHHS

DoE

NGOs

d.

Centres: assembly, evacuation, information, recovery

Council

THS

e.

Management of donated goods (clothing and household items)

DPAC

Councils

THS

NGOs

f.

Management of donated goods (financial and corporate)

DPAC

Councils

THS

NGOs

g.

Counselling

THS

DoE

NGOs

h.

Emergency catering

THS

Salvation Army

i.

Financial assistance for personal hardship and distress

DHHS

Centrelink

j.

Outreach services

THS

NGO

k.

Pastoral care

THS

NGOs

l.

Personal and community support

THS

NGOs

m.

Registration and enquiry (of affected persons related to evacuations)

TASPOL

Red Cross

Councils

WoG

n.

Volunteer (spontaneous) training & support

Regional Committees

Volunteer Tasmania

NGOs

3.

Environmental recovery

DPIPWE

Councils
DPAC

4.

Infrastructure recovery:



a.

Roads and bridges-Municipal

Councils

---

b.

Roads and bridges-State

State Growth – Traffic Infrastructure Services

---

c.

Other assets e.g. dams, pipelines, power lines etc.

Asset or utility owner

Land owner

5.

Recovery coordination (Long Term)



a.

Municipal/regional coordination

Councils

AARC

NGOs

Relevant State agencies

b.

Coordination of State Government assistance

DPAC

Relevant State agencies

c.

Planning for long-term coordination (municipal/regional)

Councils/AARC

Relevant State agencies

6.

Restoration/Re-supply of services or conditions



a.

Drinking water

TasWater

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DPIPWE Biosecurity Tasmania

b.

Electricity (very high voltage, domestic and commercial supply. Excludes Basslink which is privately owned)

TasNetworks

State Growth

AEMO

c.

Electricity generation (hydro, wind and gas) and dam safety

Hydro Tasmania

State Growth

AEMO

d.

Environmental Health

Councils

DHHS (Public Health Services)

DPIPWE EPA Division

e.

Food (continuity of supply for people)

State Growth

---

f.

Natural Gas

TasGas

State Growth

g.

Liquid fuel and LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) and LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas)

Liquid fuel suppliers

State Growth –

Infrastructure Tasmania

h.

Telecommunications including radio network

Network owner/manager

---

i.

Waste/refuse collection

Councils

DPIPWE – EPA Division

Councils

j.

Wastewater (sewage)

TasWater

DPIPWE – EPA Division

Councils

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Other Functional Responsibilities

2.52 Table 6 lists a range of functions commonly applied in PPRR activities (functions for recovery are listed in Table 5), and identifies the relevant Support Agencies. In emergency situations, and at the discretion of the response Management Authority, these responsibilities can be varied.

2.53 The functions listed in this table are not intended to be exhaustive, and changes to them can be made by agreement through the consultation framework over the life of this plan. They can also be altered as required during emergencies.

2.54 As described in paragraph 2.44, in general these responsibilities rest with State Government agencies, but the importance of owners/managers of property/premises maintaining their own capability and arrangements for emergencies, along with support from Councils, Non-Government Organisations and industry is acknowledged.

Table 6: Other Functional Responsibilities

Row

Function

Support Agency

Primary

Assisting

1.

Advice:



a.

Aboriginal heritage sites – protection during operations

DPIPWE Aboriginal Natural Heritage Tasmania


b.

Consultation framework

SES

---

c.

Emergency management plans-(from the Emergency Management Act 2006)

SES

---

d.

Emergency plans (other)

Relevant Management

Authorities/Agencies

---

e.

Emergency risk management

SES

---

f.

Environmental Health

DHHS (Public Health Services)

Councils

g.

Hazard risk assessments

Prevention and Mitigation Management Authorities

DPEM
DPIPWE – GIS and Desktop
Mapping Services

h.

Historic heritage (building, places and features)

DPIPWE
Heritage Tasmania


i.

Mitigation funding programs

SES

DPAC
TFS

j.

Natural values assessments

DPIPWE Resource Management & Conservation Division

Councils
Community/Member groups

k.

Protective security and counter terrorism arrangements

TASPOL

State Growth
DPAC
DoJ – WST

l.

Radiological and nuclear hazards

TFS

DHHS (Public Health Services)

2.

Blood supplies

Red Cross

THS

3.

Casualty triage, treatment and transport (single and multi/mass – casualty events)

Ambulance Tasmania

St John Ambulance

4.

Centres:



a.

Emergency Coordination – Municipal

Councils

SES

b.

Emergency Coordination – Regional

SES

TASPOL

c.

Emergency Operations

Response Management Authority

Support Agencies

d.

Flu Clinics

THS

DHHS (Public Health Services)
Councils

e.

State Crisis Centre

TASPOL

DPAC

5.

Civil defence

SES

ADF JOSS
Councils
TASPOL

6.

Australian Government assistance for the State in emergency operations (response and recovery)

Commonwealth agencies

SES

7.

Community awareness

Preparedness Management
Authorities

Councils
SES

8.

Coronial investigation

DoJ

TASPOL
FSST

9.

Criminal investigations

(during emergencies)

TASPOL

Support Agencies

10.

Debriefs (combined/multi-agency)

TASPOL
(Regional Controller)

Response
Management Authorities

11.

Decontamination from:



a.

CBRN events

TFS

Ambulance Tasmania
DHHS (Public Health Services)
THS
DPIPWE – EPA Division
Councils
Facility/site owner

b.

Hazardous Materials emergencies (chemical, biological, explosives)

TFS

Ambulance Tasmania
TASPOL
FSST
DHHS (Public Health Services)
THS
Councils
Facility/site owner
DPIPWE – EPA Division

c.

Analytical Services (biological)

DPIPWE Biosecurity Tasmania

FSST
DPIPWE EPA Division
DHHS (Public Health Services)

d.

Analytical Services (chemical)

DPIPWE EPA Division

FSST

12.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI)

TASPOL

DoJ Coronial Division
FSST

13.

Emergency powers (Emergency Management Act 2006):



a.

Emergency

State Controller

Regional Controllers
SEMC

b.

Special emergency

(declaration of a state of emergency)

Premier

Regional Controllers
SEMC
State Controller

c.

Risk identification and assessment

State Controller

Executive Officer, SEMC

14.

Evacuation

TASPOL

RMA – Decision to evacuate/Issue of warnings
Councils and THS – activation of centres

15.

Fire response on a marine vessel

Captain

TFS (By agreement with
Captain of the vessel)

16.

Forensic chemistry and biology services

FSST

TASPOL

17.

GIS

Web and desktop mapping systems

Coordination of remotely sensed imagery

DPIPWE ES-GIS Unit

---

18.

Guidelines for expenditure in emergencies

DTF

DPAC OSEM
SES

19.

Insurance industry advice

DPAC

Insurance Council of Australia

20.

Interoperability arrangements

DPAC

State Agencies

21.

Impact assessments (initial)

Response Management Authorities

Support Agencies Councils

22.

Land Rehabilitation

Land manager/owner

DPIPWE Natural & Cultural Heritage

23.

Land-use planning

DoJ

DPAC-OSEM
Councils
DPIPWE
SES
TFS
DoJ – WST
State Growth – Infrastructure
Tasmania

24.

Liaison (in emergencies):



a.

Colleges and schools

DoE

Association of Independent Schools

b.

Councils

SES

DPAC – OSEM
LGAT

c.

Media (at the emergency site)

Response Management Authority

Support Agencies

d.

Media (at centres)

Centre coordinator

Support Agencies

e.

Media (for the community)

Council Mayor

---

25.

Operational information – Situation reports, operational logs

Centres (Coordination, Operations, others)

Support Agencies

26.

Performance management of emergency management arrangements

TASPOL
(Regional Controller)

---

27.

Pollution Management – land

Facility/site owner

Councils
DPIPWE EPA Division
TFS
DoJ WST

28.

Pollution Management – marine



a.

In port

TasPorts

BoM
DPIPWE – EPA Division
Shipping operator
TFS
Councils

b.

Less than 3 nautical miles from the coast

DPIPWE – EPA Division

AMSA
BoM
Shipping operator
TasPorts
TFS
Councils

c.

More than 3 nautical miles from the coast

AMSA

BoM
DPIPWE EPA Division
TasPorts
TFS
Shipping operator
Councils
SES
TFS
DoJ – WST

29.

Property reinstatement
(survey & valuation)

DPIPWE Information & Land Services Division

Councils

30.

Registration:



a.

Affected persons

TASPOL

Red Cross
Councils

b.

Casualties

Ambulance Tasmania

TASPOL
THS

c.

Other stakeholders e.g. businesses

Refer to paragraph 3.3.78


d.

Spontaneous volunteers/donors

Refer to paragraph 3.3.78


e.

Witnesses

TASPOL

SES

31.

Rescue (technical):



a.

Aircraft crash (all areas except Hobart and Launceston airports)

TFS

Airline operators
SES
Ambulance Tasmania

b.

Aircraft crash (Hobart and Launceston airports)

Airservices Australia

Airline operators
SES
AFP (Hobart only)
TFS

c.

Confined space

TFS

Infrastructure/asset owner

d.

Domestic and industrial accidents

TFS

Ambulance Tasmania
Infrastructure/asset owner

e.

Extrication from road crash and heavy vehicles (rural)

SES

Ambulance Tasmania
TFS
Transport operator

f.

Extrication from road crash and heavy vehicles (urban)

TFS

Ambulance Tasmania
Transport operator

g.

Mines

Mine manager

TFS
Ambulance Tasmania
(By agreement with mine manager)

h.

Trench

TFS

Councils
Ambulance Tasmania

i.

Urban (USAR)

TFS

Ambulance Tasmania
TASPOL
SES

j.

Vertical (built environment)

TFS

SES

k.

Vertical (natural features)

TASPOL

SES
TFS
PWS

32.

Road management:



a.

Municipal roads

Councils

State Growth

b.

State roads

State Growth

State Growth – Traffic Infrastructure Services

33.

Search:



a.

Air search of coastal and inland waters

TASPOL

Ambulance Tasmania
SES
Surf Life Saving Australia
Volunteer Coast Guard

b.

Air search of territorial waters

AMSA

Ambulance Tasmania
BoM
TASPOL

c.

Land

TASPOL

Ambulance Tasmania
SES

34.

SEWS
(Standard Emergency Warning Signal)

See paragraph 3.3.47

---

35.

TasALERT

DPAC


36.

TEIS
(Tasmania Emergency Information Service)

DPAC

State Agencies (Interoperability)

37.

Traffic control –
(Any emergency except road/bridge infrastructure failure)

TASPOL

State Growth –
Traffic Infrastructure Services
SES

38.

Traffic control-Road/bridge infrastructure failure

State Growth – Traffic Infrastructure Services

TASPOL
SES

39.

Translation and interpreter service:



a.

AUSLAN (sign language)

NGOs

Community leaders

b.

Languages Other Than English (LOTE)

Department of Immigration and Border Protection

Community leaders
NGOs – Migrant Resource Centre

40.

Warnings for the community
(community warnings):



a.

About severe weather events

BoM

DHHS (Public Health Services)
Councils
Media
SES
TASPOL

b.

About the emergency

Response Management
Authority

Councils
Media
SES
TASPOL

41.

Waste Management

Land Manager

DPIPWE EPA Division

42.

Wildlife and animal welfare in emergencies



a.

Animal Welfare

(pets and companion animals)

Councils

DPIPWE Biosecurity Tasmania
Community/Member Groups

b.

Animal Welfare (livestock)

DPIPWE – Biosecurity Tasmania

Councils
Community/Member Groups

c.

Animal Welfare (wildlife care)

DPIPWE Resource Management & Conservation Division

DPIPWE – Biosecurity Tasmania
Councils
Community/Member Groups

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